Weekly incidents for Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks: Humans vs. Nature

Weekly incidents for Sequoia
The Marble Falls Trail that begins at Potwisha Campground in the foothills of Sequoia National Park, was the locale for a possible rescue on Saturday, July 18. In the summer, the area’s daytime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees.

SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK

Ash Mountain
• 7/12/2020: A driver was arrested for DUI at Ash Mountain.
• 7/18/2020: A 26-year-old female became immobile on the Marble Falls trail while hiking in 100-degree heat. A search-and-rescue operation was initiated. The hiker was later able to hike out with rangers after the temperatures began to decrease and after drinking fluids. The patient refused ambulance transport. Weekly incidents for Sequoia

Lodgepole
• 7/16/2020: Rangers responded to an 8-year-old male from Burbank, Calif., complaining of local swelling to right ear. Patient stated he was bitten by a mosquito the previous evening and had been consistently itching the bite. Outer ear was noticeably infected. Family of patient refused transport.

• 7/16/2020: Rangers responded to a call for “gashes” on the leg of a 10-year old female due to a fall on Tokopah Falls trail. The patient, from Burbank, Calif., was found already bandaged by the accompanying adults. The adults requested removal of the bandaging so rangers could assess and re-clean and dress. Weekly incidents for Sequoia

Mineral King
• 7/14/20: Rangers responded to a 16-year-old male with possible high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in lower Soda Creek. Helicopter 552 transported the patient and his father to Ash Mountain Helibase.

High Sierra
• 7/15/2020: Rangers responded to a report of a group of two individuals on the Mountaineer’s Route on Mount Whitney who requested rescue. The male had taken a tumbling fall approximately 30-40 feet, bruising his ribs and knees with significant pain. Due to the time of the call, a rescue was not possible at night. The following day, the subjects were encountered by a commercial group who assisted the pair to the summit where they planned to hike out without assistance. A ranger met with the group at Trail Crest to verify they did not require medical evaluation.

• 7/15/2020: Rangers responded to a report of a 61-year-old male with an altered level of consciousness and pain potentially secondary to trauma. The subject was assessed, and a doctor advised he could rest overnight before making a transport decision. The following morning, the patient had improved. The doctor recommended transport to the hospital by private car. The patient denied care against medical advice. Weekly incidents for Sequoia

KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK

Grant Grove
• 7/14/20 Rangers were called out in the middle of the night to Wilsonia for a report of a woman screaming. After careful listening and an area patrol, the sounds were determined to be a coyote.

• 7/18/20 Rangers responded with Ambulance 5 for a 33-year-old female who was the victim of a dog bite. She received 2 bites to her thigh, stating the dog had been leashed but pulled away from the child holding it. Wounds were cleaned and bandaged for the victim prior to her self- transporting to a clinic. The dog was claimed to be vaccinated by the owners, who left prior to Rangers’ arrival.

Wilderness Branch
• The wilderness office continues to receive about 100-150 wilderness permit reservation requests each day. Processing time is averaging about 3-4 days. Availability is being updated multiple times each week on the website to reduce applications for dates and trailheads with full quotas.

• Notifications are going out to stock users as grazing opening dates are adjusted. Weekly incidents for Sequoia
Earlier reading: Hey Hikers: Check in on time and don’t separate from your group!

One thought on “Weekly incidents for Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks: Humans vs. Nature

  • July 26, 2020 at 3:35 pm
    Permalink

    I’m not sure why, but this whole report made me giggle. 🙂

    Reply

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