Backcountry incidents require emergency measures

 

Earlier this month, several incidents occurred at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks that required emergency evacuations.

On Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, at approximately 2:40 p.m., a wilderness ranger received a report of a 66-year-old male suffering from extreme lower back pain at the base of Wallace Creek near Junction Meadow in Sequoia National Park. The hiker was unable to continue the trip by hiking or riding out by horse or mule.

On August 8, a park medic was flown to the patient, and he was transported to a helibase at Sequoia National Park, where he was transported to the hospital by ambulance.

On Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, at 10:17 a.m., the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks dispatch office received a report from Tulare County Fire of a 51-year-old woman having seizures in the Inyo National Forest within Tulare County, approximately 500 feet from the park boundary near the Kern Ranger Station. The patient's family requested that she be evacuated by helicopter.

Sequoia National Park sent a park medic by helicopter to the area. After an initial assessment, the patient was flown to a helibase at Sequoia National Park and transported to the hospital by ambulance.

Also on Tuesday, Aug. 5, at 2:04 p.m., Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks dispatch office received a satellite phone call from an individual whose hiking companion collapsed in the Nine Lakes Basin area near Kaweah Gap in Sequoia National Park. The patient was a 56-year-old male from Livermore. The patient's three hiking companions initiated CPR and continued providing lifesaving measures for approximately one hour. He failed to respond to CPR and never regained a pulse. Two park medics flew to the scene. Medical control was contacted and the park was instructed to discontinue lifesaving efforts. The body was flown to a helibase in Sequoia National Park and transferred to the coroner.

On Saturday, Aug. 2, at 1:12 p.m., a 57-year-old female activated a personal locator beacon near Nine Lakes Basin in Sequoia National Park to request emergency assistance. A park medic was flown by helicopter to the patient. The patient was transported to a helibase and transported to the hospital by ambulance.

Park medics are park rangers with specialty medical training. Their training is similar to an EMT-Intermediate, but with an expanded pharmacological and procedural scope of practice. Park medics in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park provide EMS services under protocols written, reviewed, and revised by park medic residents. Park medics call for medical direction from the field to the University Medical Center emergency department in Fresno, where trained residents provide advice and consultation via radio.Earlier this month, several incidents occurred at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks that required emergency evacuations.

On Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, at approximately 2:40 p.m., a wilderness ranger received a report of a 66-year-old male suffering from extreme lower back pain at the base of Wallace Creek near Junction Meadow in Sequoia National Park. The hiker was unable to continue the trip by hiking or riding out by horse or mule.

On August 8, a park medic was flown to the patient, and he was transported to a helibase at Sequoia National Park, where he was transported to the hospital by ambulance.

On Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, at 10:17 a.m., the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks dispatch office received a report from Tulare County Fire of a 51-year-old woman having seizures in the Inyo National Forest within Tulare County, approximately 500 feet from the park boundary near the Kern Ranger Station. The patient's family requested that she be evacuated by helicopter.

 

Sequoia National Park sent a park medic by helicopter to the area. After an initial assessment, the patient was flown to a helibase at Sequoia National Park and transported to the hospital by ambulance.

Also on Tuesday, Aug. 5, at 2:04 p.m., Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks dispatch office received a satellite phone call from an individual whose hiking companion collapsed in the Nine Lakes Basin area near Kaweah Gap in Sequoia National Park. The patient was a 56-year-old male from Livermore. The patient's three hiking companions initiated CPR and continued providing lifesaving measures for approximately one hour. He failed to respond to CPR and never regained a pulse. Two park medics flew to the scene. Medical control was contacted and the park was instructed to discontinue lifesaving efforts. The body was flown to a helibase in Sequoia National Park and transferred to the coroner.

On Saturday, Aug. 2, at 1:12 p.m., a 57-year-old female activated a personal locator beacon near Nine Lakes Basin in Sequoia National Park to request emergency assistance. A park medic was flown by helicopter to the patient. The patient was transported to a helibase and transported to the hospital by ambulance.

Park medics are park rangers with specialty medical training. Their training is similar to an EMT-Intermediate, but with an expanded pharmacological and procedural scope of practice. Park medics in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park provide EMS services under protocols written, reviewed, and revised by park medic residents. Park medics call for medical direction from the field to the University Medical Center emergency department in Fresno, where trained residents provide advice and consultation via radio.

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