Election 2020: What you need to know

Election Day 2020 is Tuesday, November 3

November 3, Election Day 2020, arguably will be one of the most important days in U.S. history. It’s a presidential election where there is a clear referendum for where this country is headed for at least the next four years. Will democracy be strengthened and rights of citizenship and economic opportunity be extended to more people than ever before? Or do we continue down the road of nationalism to preserve and protect the rights of certain groups at the expense of others. 

Here’s how the changes dictated by COVID-19 ensure that Election 2020 will be unlike any other.

Every registered voter in the state, including Tulare County, will receive a vote-by-mail ballot. The deadline to register to vote is Monday, October 19, but provisional registrations will be accepted right up to Election Day on November 3. Voters who register after October 19 will vote provisionally, meaning that their vote will not be counted until it is certain that they have not voted anywhere else.

Polling locations, called modified vote centers, will be established at 19 locations throughout Tulare County. There will be one vote center for every 10,000 registered voters. There are currently 187,000 registered voters in Tulare County. Election officials expect that number to increase by two or three thousand by election day.

Most vote centers will be open for four days up to and including election day for those who want to drop off their mail-in ballots (except for Three Rivers; see below). Election 2020: What you

Registered voters in Tulare County should expect to receive ballots and election materials in October. 

Three Rivers votes— Foothills communities including Three Rivers, Springville, and the Tule River Reservation, because of their more remote locations, will have their own vote centers but they will be open only on election day, November 3.

In Three Rivers, the voting center will be at its traditional polling place: the Three Rivers Memorial Building.

Voters who choose to vote by mail may register to track the progress of their ballot through a state-mandated tracking system. To track your ballot online: www.wheresmyballot.sos.ca.gov. That is the official tracking system and it will be supervised by California Secretary of State Alex Padilla. Election 2020: What you

“There have been a number of voters who have expressed concerns about what happens to their ballots once they are mailed,” said Michelle Baldwin, Tulare County Registrar of Voters. “We think the tracking system will ensure that every vote is counted correctly.”

For voter registration information or for any questions about the upcoming presidential election on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, call the Tulare County Elections Office at  559-624-7000. Election 2020: What you

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9 thoughts on “Election 2020: What you need to know

  • August 28, 2020 at 9:49 am
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    John–You have it all wrong. The election is between those who want to destroy the country and the Constitution and those who are striving to preserve them. Bob and Mary Hohne

    Reply
  • August 28, 2020 at 10:44 am
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    I attempted to register to track my mail-in ballot. I filled in all the blanks, but could not save or get confirmation. I called the number provided and got an immediate voicemail response with the message that I would be transferred. I received a “fast-busy” signal – end of story. I’ll try again before I call the elections office.

    Reply
  • August 28, 2020 at 11:11 am
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    Possibly, you need to rephrase the first paragraph re:election news. This is slightly biased??? Thank you!

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  • August 28, 2020 at 1:11 pm
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    Yes, Sally, I was wondering the same thing…isn’t the news and those who entrusted to reporting the news, supposed to be reporting “Just the facts and not their opinions” in the main news columns.

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  • August 28, 2020 at 2:59 pm
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    Mr. Elliott, you may as well have been reprinting an Associated Press para. Thus your ‘reporting’ is no different than 99.5% of the rest of ‘journalism’. And I do know whereof I write: I’ve been teaching and working with journalists for 37 years.

    What encourages me is that your obvious bias is having a decreasing effect on the American electorate.

    Reply
  • August 29, 2020 at 8:56 am
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    Drove to Whitney Portal a week ago to do a car shuttle for friends walking the High Sierra Trail, and it’ll be my longest excursion in this summer of Covid, and in 10 hours of driving and observing the vehicles in front of me en route, not one campaign bumper sticker was affixed to the rear echelon.

    A pox on both parties, i’m voting for Wink Martindale again as in 2016, lets get a competent game show host in the oval office.

    Reply
  • September 3, 2020 at 6:21 pm
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    Nov. 3 2020 Election is between Good and Evil and its very clear who is the Evil sitting back and watching businesses burn to the ground….unless you are watching CNN…they say its peaceful protests.

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  • September 5, 2020 at 11:08 am
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    It clearly states on the Masthead NEWS AND VIEWS…..Good job John and Sarah. I miss the paper, but understand the reason for online distribution, only…..wasn’t The Kaweah Commonwealth described as, “A journal for those that think” e.g.??

    Reply
  • September 6, 2020 at 2:44 pm
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    NO ! ON PROP. 15

    Reply

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