Evacuation and ‘hardening homes’: Is Three Rivers ready for a fire emergency?

Three Rivers Fire Safe Council

In 2018, when the local Fire Safe Council was officially organized, the consensus was there was a dangerous wildland fire in the future of Three Rivers, fueled by a warming climate. If, as a community, we garnered grants, completed a risk assessment plan, and stepped up the property clearance we might be prepared to dodge the inevitable bullet. Is Three Rivers ready

But the tinder-dry landscape and the fact that Three Rivers is surrounded by parched public lands, the risk for catastrophic fire is accelerating at a feverish pace. Fire season is year-round now. In fact, with more than two months left to go in 2020, when conditions exist for the most serious fires, more than 2.4 million acres has already gone up in smoke in California setting a new all-time high for acreage burned.

To give an example of how the fire danger is accelerating, in 2015 the Rough Fire, burning in mostly Fresno County national forest land, burned 150,000 acres in three months. The Creek Fire, which started in the Huntington Lake area of Fresno County on September 4, burned 150,000 acres in four days. Is Three Rivers ready

Three Rivers, with a good reputation for property clearance and fire safety, is making steady progress in its goal to become a “fire adapted” community. Is Three Rivers ready

Local efforts to become fire adapted are being led by the Three Rivers Fire Safe Council. During an unprecedented smoke event this week, 3R News sat down with Steve and Elizabeth LaMar to dispel evacuation rumors and to begin a series of on-going interviews on what’s on the FSC agenda and how Three Rivers can be prepared for the inevitable fire emergency. i i i i i i i i i i

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11 thoughts on “Evacuation and ‘hardening homes’: Is Three Rivers ready for a fire emergency?

  • September 11, 2020 at 9:55 am
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    Good job!!

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  • September 11, 2020 at 11:37 am
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    All smoke and mirrors at TC Fire Department and Tulare County PC and BOS. They fight tooth and nail any and all restrictions on campfires at private AirBnbs, forcing community members into the position of policing then establish zero monitoring and enforcement for whatever lax regulations they script, force every community member in SRA zones to clear their properties and turn around and allow exemptions for public campgrounds full of drunken morons, placate and push commercial development way up our tinder dry drainages with no alternative evacuations on crap roads, directly undermine all the hard work of countless volunteers and 3R Fire Safe Council, it’s all just a ticking time bomb. Sure, let’s fund a 2.7 million dollar bridge to nowhere at the end of SF, on roads with no additional maintenance and a campground with no oversight, in a place with 0.2% of park entrance visitation, but we can’t find any additional Law Enforcement Officers in 3R – a town run amok with vacation rentals and overtourism. Nice interview a while back with Mike Boudreaux, in which he pretended to be oblivious to the fact that 3R had only one LEO or that there was any issue whatsoever with overtourism in 3R. The man has zero integrity and only pivots on what’s advantageous to him – to say nothing of Do-Nothing Crocker making motions to vote down whatever’s in the best interest of 3R.

    This place has gone to Hell.

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    • September 13, 2020 at 1:31 pm
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      Unfortunately you are correct. The county prefers TOT over regulating such things as zoning regulations and the safety and security of us local non tot paying residents

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  • September 13, 2020 at 5:40 pm
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    Kirk and Carl might be making some valid points. However, I don’t have the time nor patience to decode your messages.
    Please help me with: BOS, SRA, LEO, and TOT.

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    • September 13, 2020 at 10:15 pm
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      FYI TOT: transient occupancy tax; BOS: Board of Supervisors; SRA State responsibility area: LEO law enforcement officer.

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  • September 14, 2020 at 3:42 am
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    Aa a new Three Rivers resident. What can we do to change this? If we get loud enough will that help?

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    • September 14, 2020 at 8:52 am
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      Get involved with the Three Rivers Fire Safe Council.

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      • September 14, 2020 at 10:06 am
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        What actually is Three Rivers Fire Safe Council and how can we get involved?

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  • September 14, 2020 at 6:43 pm
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    Thank you, John and Sarah!

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  • September 15, 2020 at 7:36 am
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    Be safe my friends. Thinking of you all.

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  • September 17, 2020 at 8:26 am
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    One thing that can be done is to change the zoning regulations- no longer allow any flammable construction materials for building new homes and commercial in all of the Foothill areas. Presently rules in the SRA (state responsibility area) restrict certain parts of a building such as the roof and the eaves and windows, but wood is still allowed for siding and framing. Note how after a fire the only thing remaining is the masonry chimney. Options are bricks, concrete blocks, rammed earth, concrete, hardipanel facing over steel framing and some newer form systems that result in concrete walls with insulation.

    Reply

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