Running for beginners: Week 4

 

To read previous articles:

Week 1Week 2Week 3

 

Here is a tip when planning for a running event: Nothing new on race day!

Nothing new on race day means exactly that. Do what you’ve been doing during training. Don’t wear new shoes and do dress in clothes that you know are comfortable while staying  with your eating routine. 

The first factor in choosing your race-day outfit is the weather, of course, but if possible, wear the clothes you wore on your best training day. That way you know there won’t be chafing, bagging, scrunching, itching, slipping, tearing, or wedging. 

The same goes for shoes. It’s a nice treat to reward yourself with running shoes, but make sure they’re broken in and pass the comfort test before race day.

As for eating, this could be tricky if race time is different from your normal training time. But a general rule is don’t eat a meal within two hours of the start time. If you don’t eat before your  daily runs, but you are out running by 7 a.m., you might get hungry and run out of fuel during your race if the start time is an hour or so later.

So practice your pre-race eating routine before race day. A banana and piece of toast or bagel with almond butter, a bowl of oatmeal with raisins, or a smoothie, consisting of about 200 to 300 calories are all good pre-race fuel.

Whatever you select, it should be whole, unprocessed carbohydrates low in fiber and fat, both of which take a long time to digest.

Be sure to wash down your prerace meal with plenty of fluids. Aim to consume about 20 ounces of fluids two to three hours before the race, and another 10 ounces about a half-hour before the race begins. It’s okay to have coffee, tea, or a high-quality sports drink if you regularly drink those fluids before your runs and they don’t upset your stomach.

If concerned about being hungry at start time, then supplement your pre-race breakfast with an energy gel, banana, raisins, or anything else that’s easy to digest. Eat this about 20 minutes before the start, keeping to about 150 calories.

Whatever you consume, make it something that’s worked for you during your regular training runs. It should make you feel energized and not leave you with a full or upset stomach. 

Don’t try anything new or your first 5K or 10K might just be derailed by a pit stop. Don’t lose sight of how far you’ve come to get to the start line of your first race. You deserve to enjoy the day.

To register for the Kaweah Country Run, go to www.kaweahcountryrun.com.

The fine print: You should consult your physician or other healthcare professional before starting this or any other fitness program to determine if it is right for your needs. Do not start this fitness program if your physician or healthcare provider advises against it. If you experience faintness, dizziness, pain, or shortness of breath at any time while exercising you should stop immediately.

 

WEEK 4 (of 12): Beginners' 5K Training Schedule

Monday, Oct. 3: Walk or cross train (40 minutes)

Tuesday, Oct. 4: Run (15 minutes)

Wednesday, Oct. 5: Run (15 minutes)

Thursday, Oct. 6: Run (15 minutes)

Friday, Oct. 7: Rest

Saturday, Oct. 8: Walk or cross train (40 minutes)

Sunday, Oct. 9: Run (1.5 MILES)

 

WEEK 4 (of 12): Beginners' 10K Training Schedule

Monday, Oct. 3: Walk or cross train (60 minutes)

Tuesday, Oct. 4: Run (25 minutes)

Wednesday, Oct. 5: Run (20 minutes)

Thursday, Oct. 6: Run (25 minutes)

Friday, Oct. 7: Rest

Saturday, Oct. 8: Walk or cross train (60 minutes)

Sunday, Oct. 9: Run (3 MILES)

 

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