Tulare County coronavirus daily cases trending back down (403): January 21 by the numbers

U.S. coronavirus death toll eclipses 420,000
The U.S. COVID-19 death toll surpassed 240,000 in early November 2020, and as of Thanksgiving Day, November 26, nearly 270,000 had died. Some public health experts predict the total could be 567,195 by April 1, 2021. Tulare County coronavirus

COVID-19 in Tulare County 
COVID-19 cases testing positive in Tulare County (as of Thursday, January, 21 11:46 a.m. PDT): 42,541 
Deaths: 529
Recovered: 37,182Tulare County coronavirus
Self-quarantine (and monitored by Tulare County Public Health): 306
In the past seven days, the daily average for new positive cases decreased from 501 to 403; and in the same period there were 35 deaths compared to 53 the previous week. Cases testing positive are decreasing again from  record highs during Christmas week; these record highs were ten times a daily case load of around 50 that ended in early November.
The breakdown of confirmed cases in Tulare County
By method—
Travel-related: 68
Person-to-Person Contact: 11,414
Unknown / Under Investigation: 31,059Tulare County coronavirus
(Researchers currently believe one infected person generally infects two or more others)
By age group—
Ages 0-17: 6,202
Ages 18-25: 6,676
Ages 26-40: 12,041
Ages 41-64:  13,194
Ages 65+: 4,404

⇒ See the 3R NewsCOVID-19 RESOURCES page here

 


California Department of Public Health (CDPH) 

Total COVID-19 cases testing positive in California (as of Thursday, January 21, 1:30 p.m.): 3,094,943

Deaths: 35,480ulare County coronavirus
(78 percent of the deaths are in the 65-and-older age category)


Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Total COVID-19 cases testing positive in the U.S. and its territories (as of Thursday, January 21, 1:30 p.m.): 25,179,647. 
Deaths: 419,855
Active cases: 9,665,039Tulare County coronavirus


Worldwide

Total COVID-19 cases confirmed globally (as of Thursday January 21, 1:30 p.m.): 98,037,017 (25,391,529) currently infected; 99% in mild condition).
Deaths: 2,097,870
Recovered: 70,436,331 Tulare County coronavirus


Stay up to date on coronavirus (COVID-19)

All the information with just one click. See the COVID-19 RESOURCES page. 

 

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19 thoughts on “Tulare County coronavirus daily cases trending back down (403): January 21 by the numbers

  • March 27, 2020 at 10:08 am
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    Would also appreciate seeing a stat of positive cases who recovered. Is that available for Tulare County and California?

    Reply
    • April 1, 2020 at 3:05 pm
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      Hi Kay, doesn’t it say 3?

      Reply
    • May 8, 2020 at 6:32 pm
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      It’s there–155 recovered in Tulare County. There is no data that I’ve seen for recovered cases in California today as some counties have not reported their recovered cases. It’s clear how many people are needed to track and slow this when you think about this data, right? People to track who’s tested positive, track and notify anyone they’ve been in contact with, test those people, and if they’re positive, everyone they’ve come in contact with. It’s a massive undertaking.

      Reply
  • April 11, 2020 at 8:07 am
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    The computer modelling regarding the Covid-19 situation continues to get revised drastically downwards in terms of projected deaths in the US. That’s great…. the fewer the better. But starting at 2.2 million deaths, then 600,000, then 200,000, and now down to 60,000, certainly engenders distrust in the “experts” at CDC and others who are involved in the responses to the outbreak.
    I’m beginning to suspect that those developing the computer models are the same people who told us the Arctic would be ice-free by 2016, the polar bears would be nearly extinct by 2018, and folks going to work in Miami and Lower Manhattan in 2020 would need to wear galoshes due to rising sea levels.

    Reply
    • April 30, 2020 at 9:38 pm
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      I agree with your statement.

      Reply
    • July 17, 2020 at 6:58 am
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      Isn’t it interesting to read this comment now, on July 16, 2020, when the death rate in the US Is above 140,000! Guess those model makers weren’t so dumb after all!

      Reply
  • May 1, 2020 at 12:54 pm
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    Bill,
    Maybe the lower number is because we Americans Sheltered In Place in large enough numbers that it slowed the contagious disease down and we only (I say this with bowed head because I have not lost anyone like thousands around the country have) have 63,000 + deaths today. That many in what, 8 weeks? More than died in the years of Vietnam War. Sad.
    I express my condolences to all who lost friends and family and gratitude for all the brave souls who stepped up to take care of the sick, feed us, police us, fire fight for us, work in markets and drug stories, pick food for us while the rest of us stay out of the way until a vaccine can save us all. Oh and thank you to the thousands of scientists world wide working on a vaccine. May it come sooner than later.
    Shirley Keller

    Reply
  • May 7, 2020 at 4:28 pm
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    Wow! Is all I can say…
    Thanks for keeping us updated on this.
    I appreciate you.

    Reply
  • June 5, 2020 at 10:57 pm
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    The June 5 update indicates 3 mountain cases and implies there in 3 rivers. Couldn’t they be in Springville or Badger or any other small locations on the Tulare county map?

    Reply
    • June 6, 2020 at 11:16 am
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      Those cases are just in the mountain communities in general. We are not getting accurate stats for Three Rivers and I suspect for other parts of
      Tulare County as well. Stay safe.

      Reply
  • June 12, 2020 at 10:04 am
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    Bill S. Three thumbs up on your comments, I agree!

    Reply
  • July 17, 2020 at 8:28 am
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    Wear your mask everywhere! It’s not a political statement. It just means you want to stay alive a bit longer!

    Reply
  • August 29, 2020 at 1:50 pm
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    I appreciate you putting this in paper. The number of Mountain Cases has not been updated for a while; it now stands at 38. Stating that no cases have been reported in Three Rivers is somewhat misleading as the Mountain Cases are not broken down by zip code and Three Rivers could, and probably has had some cases. Lastly, the number of new cases by day seems to be trending downward, clearly showing that mask wearing and social distancing is working.

    Reply
    • August 31, 2020 at 5:20 pm
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      Dee: thanks for paying attention to the numbers. The county won’t verify how many cases for Three Rivers. Previously they told me it wasn’t proper protocol to mention specific unincorporporated
      towns unless they had more than 11 cases. It’s probably something different now and they are hoping I’ve quit asking.
      John Elliott

      Reply
  • October 10, 2020 at 7:26 am
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    I have several friends around the country who tested positive but never became symptomatic (i.e., never got sick in any way), and I have no acquaintances who tested positive who become symptomatic. I’ve heard that the rate of false-positive tests is rather high, but even allowing for that possibility, I have to ask: Why are the only numbers of so-called case we get from “officials” including all positive-tested folks? Why are those who tested positive but were never symptomatic included in the recovered numbers, considering that they never had anything to recover from? I won’t venture into any of the various theories as to why more accurate info isn’t provided, but something doesn’t smell right.

    Reply

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